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Posts Tagged ‘Europe’

How to order coffee in Italy

Monday, June 11th, 2018 | BLOG | No Comments

When coffee houses like Starbucks, first became popular in the United States, I had the worst time ordering exactly what I wanted as I was more familiar with these terms in Italy. I like Caffe Latte, but here I was getting something more like milk with American coffee, not expresso with hot milk, really bad stuff. In the USA, we ask for “latte”, but in Italy, that is simply “milk”, so if you don’t say “caffee latte”, you will just get a glass of milk.  

Reading a menu at an Italian coffee bar can feel like more than just a foreign language, it’s a glimpse into Italy’s culture and identity. Unlike American coffee, Caffè Italiano revolves solely around espresso and the different ways it can be served. Here’s an in-depth guide to your options for how to order your coffee like an Italian.

Coffee:

The Basic Caffè: A simple espresso. Though caffè means “coffee” in Italian, it isn’t your standard American coffee. If you’re unfamiliar with espressos, you’ll be getting a small cup of strong coffee served on a saucer with a spoon

Cappuccino: An espresso with steamed whole milk and foam, an Italian favorite typically served in a slightly larger cup than the espresso.

Caffè Latte: An espresso with hot milk, served in a glass. Remember to ask for “caffe latte” or you will end up with just a glass of milk!

Caffè Macchiato: An espresso with a bit of foamed milk on top. Macchiato means “marked” or “stained,” so it is an espresso “marked” with a little foamed milk.  

Latte Macchiato: A glass of steamed milk with a bit of espresso, or “marked” with a small amount of espresso. If you want a bit more espresso, like a double latte, order a dark version, or latte macchiato scuro.

 

More Than Milk

Caffè con Panna: An espresso topped with sweet, often fresh, whipped cream. This drink is especially for those who want a sweeter version of the caffè macchiato.

Caffè Corretto: An espresso with a drop of liquor. Popular choices are grappa, Sambuca, or cognac.

Caffè con Zucchero: An espresso with sugar added for you. Most bars have patrons add their own sugar from a packet or container at the bar.

 

Less Caffeinated 

Decaffeinato or Caffè Hag: A decaffeinated espresso. Hag is the largest producer of decaf coffee in Italy, so some bars will write their name on the menu instead of decaffeinato.

Caffè Lungo: A “long” espresso, when the barista allows the machine to pour water until the coffee is weak and bitter.

Caffè Americano: An espresso diluted with hot water, the closest drink to American filtered coffee you’ll find in an Italian bar.

Caffè Americano Decaffeinato: A decaf espresso diluted with hot water, the closest drink to American filtered decaf coffee.

Cold Coffee:

Caffè Shakerato: An espresso shaken with sugar and ice, typically served in a martini or cocktail glass. Some bars add chocolate syrup for an extra layer of sweetness.

Caffè Freddo: An espresso served iced or cold, typically served in a glass. If you order a caffè freddo alla vaniglia, you can add vanilla syrup or vanilla liquor to the mix.

Granita di Caffè: An espresso-flavored icy slush, typically with added sugar, almost like a coffee snow cone.

 

Regional Specialities:

Espresso in Naples typically comes with the sugar added. If you don’t like your coffee sweet, order un caffè sense zucchero. Try Caffè alla Nocciola, an espresso with froth and hazelnut cream, for a special local treat.

In Milan, coffee bars serve an upside-down cappuccino called a marocchino. Served in a served in a small glass sprinkled with cocoa powder a marocchino starts with a bottom layer of frothed milk and is finished off with a shot of espresso.

The Piemontese enjoy a traditional drink created from layers of dense hot cocoa, espresso and cream, called bicerìn.

 

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10 Best Reasons to Take a River Cruise

Friday, November 29th, 2013 | BLOG, Cruises | No Comments

10 Best Reasons to Take a River Cruise

Docked in ViennaRiver cruising is the in-vogue travel trend, so popular that more than two-dozen new river ships will debut in 2014. I have personally seen the growth having spent a lot of time in the Rhine River area during the past 15 + years. Explore such cities as Paris, Vienna and Budapest. Cruises on the Danube and Rhine continue to be the most popular, but that’s just the beginning of where you can go. France is getting new attention with Bordeaux in addition to the Seine and Rhone. Even Italy is getting attention with the Po River and Portugal’s Douro Valley in the wine region. Other popular destinations include Russia’s Volga, China’s Yangtze, the Mekong. One of the newest is cruising in Myanmar. And be sure not to overlook the Castle on the Rhinebeautiful springtime tulip cruises and the ever popular Christmas Market cruises. The popularity of river cruising started in Europe, but we now have many river cruises closer to home. In addition to the Mississippi, we have a new sternwheeler on the Columbia & Snake Rivers in the Northwest.

1. River cruises get you to inland Bucket List places.
2. Experience is leisurely
3.  Ships are intimate
4. Time to explore
5. Better cabins
6. Nicer ships
7. Local tastes & culture
8. Not a lot of extra charges
9. Casual dress code
10. It’s for grownups

I can’t go into detail here on the 10 best reasons to take a river cruise, but I’ll be happy to talk to you in person or you can email me for a complete list and even more reasons to take a river cruise.

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